• AC Repair

Air Conditioner Repair Overview

Everyone relies on their air conditioning unit during those unbearably hot summer months. But like all machines, your air conditioning system relies on you, too. Central air conditioning systems and individual units need regular maintenance and repair to continue to function well.

Without regular maintenance, filters become dirty, coils become bent, and drains become clogged. If it’s not taken care of, it can result in damage to your air conditioning unit over time. What’s more, you’re going to pay huge amounts in energy bills without the benefit of a temperate home because poorly maintained air conditioning units.

In fact, inadequate maintenance is one of the most common causes of ac problems that end up requiring repairs from a technician. Additionally, allowing the system or unit to get dirty and forcing it to work overtime causes compressors and fans to fail far before their expiration date. You could end up paying for an expensive repair or even an ac replacement all because you failed to have the system cleaned regularly.

Many people don’t notice their air conditioners until they don’t work. But here, we’ll outline the costs of inefficient air conditioners, the most common problems with ac units, and how HVAC technicians are an important part of making your home more efficient.

The Hidden Costs of AC Problems

According to the Department of Energy, heating and cooling make up approximately 48% of all the energy use in a typical home. Air conditioning alone makes up 6% of all the energy used in the United States every year.

If you factor in the intense heat in Texas and the demands on air conditioning systems in the summer, these figures may even be higher.

As you can see, a huge portion of your monthly energy budget goes to heating and cooling, so you want to make sure you’re using that budget as efficiently as possible. If you’re not, you could see something that’s already energy expensive become even more expensive.

Allowing your air conditioning system to run inefficiently because it’s dirty, old, or in need of repair may do more than failing to cool your house. It could also drive up your energy bills at the same time.

So, while maintaining your air conditioner may not seem like a major priority, the consequences of forgetting about it could be dire. Not only will you pay through the nose for a house that isn’t cool, but you could also run your air conditioner out of service years before a well-maintained system would need replacing.

Three Symptoms That Your AC Needs Repair

Refrigerant Leaks

Your air conditioner needs refrigerant to operate smoothly. If it’s low on refrigerant, then either it leaks or there wasn’t enough added when it was installed.

You can’t simply add more refrigerant if it’s leaking. In fact, it’s bad for the environment to do so because it will be released into the air.

If your refrigerant is low, call a technician to see if there is a leak.

Sensor Issues

The thermostat sensor in your air conditioner is found behind the control panel. It measures not the room temperature but the temperature of the air moving through the evaporative coil.

You might have a sensor problem if the air conditioner begins to behave strangely or if it cycles constantly.

The sensor needs to be moved back into place for it to begin working normally again.

Electronic Failures

The electrical connections in your act unit should be checked by a professional during a professional service call. If the wires begin to show signs of corrosion, it can lead to the early loss of the compressor or fan controls.

This can also happen when the air conditioner turns on and off too often, like when it behaves erratically because of sensor issues.

What Can an AC Service Near Me Do for My Home AC Unit?

A home air conditioner repair consists of performing all the maintenance and repairs that you’re unable to do.

A well-trained technician can:

  • Check the refrigerant level
  • Test for leaks of refrigerant
  • Remove free flowing refrigerant so it’s not released into the atmosphere
  • Check for leakage in your central ac system
  • Seal any leakage they find
  • Measure the airflow from the evaporator coil
  • Verify the correct sequence on the electrical controls
  • Inspect the electric terminals and apply non-conductive coatings
  • Check the belts and oil the motor
  • Assess the accuracy of the system’s thermostat

Our technicians include these services and more in an annual inspection that makes sure your air conditioning unit is running at an optimum level.

Maintenance and Prevention

The best way to put off major repairs is to put a maintenance program in place.

Here are a few of the things you can check in on and maintain on your own:

Maintenance and Prevention

The best way to put off major repairs is to put a maintenance program in place.

Here are a few of the things you can check in on and maintain on your own:

Air Conditioner Filters

The filter of the air condition needs to be cleaned or replaced on a regular basis.

When a filter becomes dirty or clogged, it blocks the airflow from the system. It dramatically impacts the efficiency of the air conditioner because the whole system must work harder to expel the air. You may even notice the system lagging and turn on a higher setting, which only wastes efficiency and energy.

The Department of Energy says that a clean filter alone can lower your machines energy consumption by up to 15%.

Replace or clean your filter at least once every two months during the hotter months. If your house is dusty or you have pets, it’s better to replace it once a month.

Air Conditioner Coils

You can protect your air conditioner coils by installing clean filters on a regular basis and by minimizing the amount of dirt or debris around the condenser unit if it’s sitting outside. Be sure to sweep the area regularly.

Your evaporator coil should also be cleaned once a year. This is a task you can complete yourself, but it can also be done as part of a maintenance package available from a local ac repair service.

Coil Fins

The coils on your air conditioner have aluminum fins that are easily bent. If they’re bent, they might block the airflow through the coil.

These fins need to move back to their original position. If you’re familiar with your unit, you can do this with a tool known as a “fin comb.” If not, an ac repair technician can diagnose the problem and bend them back without a problem.

Condensate Drains

The condensate drains become clogged over time if they aren’t regularly maintained. When the drains become clogged, the air conditioning unit can’t reduce the level of humidity in our home. The result can cause discolored walls and floors because of the excess moisture and condensation.

The Real Costs of Heating and Cooling

The HVAC system in your home is what keeps your heating and cooling working correctly. Before you install or replace one, it’s crucial to know the costs and work involved. There are several types of HVAC units – and even some other heating and cooling options – to consider, and this guide can help you find the right one for you.

The Cost of HVAC Units

HVAC systems aren’t a one-size-fits-all element for your home. There are different brands to choose from that will vary in cost. Here are some of the more common brands and their median prices:

  • Amana ($4350): Amana has a gas and electric HVAC package, relying on gas for heat and electric for air conditioning, that is one of its most popular models. Its design even keeps out dust and debris to keep the unit in the best working condition possible.
  • American Standard ($4350): American Standard is best known for its incredible efficient systems that can save you significant costs on your heating and cooling bills. Its Gold line offers stainless steel parts that resist corrosion.
  • Bryant ($4400): Bryant’s innovative ductless HVAC systems can heat and cool your home and allow for the most flexibility.
  • Carrier ($4000): Carrier’s Comfort Series is one of its most popular, allowing up to 5 tons of cooling and a 13 SEER.
  • Coleman ($2900): The Coleman Echelon Series is certified ENERGY STAR Most Efficient and may cut energy costs up to 50% over older models.
  • Goodman ($2900): Goodman offers some of the most affordable systems on the market. Its newest Dual-Fuel packaged unit has a heavy-duty stainless-steel heat exchanger for efficiency.
  • Lennox ($4050): Lennox offers several systems for a variety of budgets, but its Merit series is the most budget-friendly while still designed for efficient and reliable cooling and heating.
  • Rheem ($2850): Rheem’s best seller is its Classic series, which has a 13 SEER and a Scroll compressor that keeps the unit quieter than other models with reciprocating compressors.
  • Trane ($4050): One of Trane’s best features for its HVAC systems is that their looks match their performance, seamlessly blending in with your home. Specific Trane units can also connect to the Nexia home system for complete smart controls.
  • York ($4000): York’s Affinity system is one of the most popular for residential buildings, with advanced technology that creates ultimate comfort with little energy.

Most HVAC systems hover in the range of $4000 to $4400, but some can be as high as $5000 or more and as low as $1900. Although performance should be your number one priority, it’s also important to know how much to expect to pay so that you can find one that fits within your budget.

The Cost of HVAC Labor

Remember that, when installing an HVAC system, the system itself is only one cost involved. Another important – and, perhaps, most significant – cost is the labor it takes to install it.

Some of the factors that may affect your HVAC’s labor costs include:

  • The size of your home
  • The age and construction of your home
  • How complicated the project will be
  • Existing ductwork quality
  • Your local regulations
  • Indoor air quality you desire
  • Type of materials and system you chose

Only a qualified HVAC technician can give you an accurate quote based on these factors. The technician will need to tour your home and take some notes so that he can provide a quote. However, you should always budget a little more than the quoted cost to account for anything unexpected during installation.

Although labor costs can vary greatly, you should expect to pay anywhere from $50 to $200 per hour for your HVAC technician’s labor.

Typical Rebates and Warranties

Rebates

You may be eligible for rebates from the government, your state, or your locality for the HVAC system you installed, especially if it’s an incredibly energy-efficient model.

You can check out the federal tax credits for HVAC systems here. Check with your local utility department for any potential tax credits or rebates for your installation, and the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency for state-specific rebates.

Your HVAC components’ manufacturer may also have rebates available for your system. Rheem, for example, has a Rebate Center that lists all current discounts for its products.

Warranties

Another important factor when finding the right HVAC system is its warranty. Warranties can make the difference between a system that eats up your savings on maintenance and repairs and a system that saves you money over time.

For most systems, you’ll need to register with the manufacturer to become eligible for a warranty. Usually, you’ll have up to three months to fill out the registration but try to do it as soon as possible so you don’t forget.

Warranties typically cover things like:

  • Humidifiers
  • Compressors
  • Coils
  • Heat exchangers
  • Thermostats
  • Internal components

However, you won’t have warranty coverage on some matters relating to your HVAC system, like labor costs for repairs and maintenance, filters and fuses, non-manufacturer parts you bought and replaced, parts that don’t affect the system’s performance, and any problems that stem from you or a non-certified person attempting to repair the system.

In fact, the manufacturer may void your warranty entirely if you or someone else causes damage to the system or if the damage is caused by a failure to maintain your HVAC elements properly.

The average HVAC warranty lasts between 5 and 10 years, but some offer 20 years of coverage. It’s a good idea, when possible, to opt for a system that provides the most extended coverage to give your system more insurance.

Understanding How HVAC Works

Components

Although HVAC systems from different manufacturers all vary slightly, there are many components that are necessary to make them work. Most HVAC systems have the following elements in common:

  • Air conditioner: This unit is what will cool your air and usually requires electricity for power.
  • Furnace or heater: A furnace or heater is what you’ll use in colder months to warm your home. These can be either gas or electricity-powered, but it’s more common to see gas furnaces in modern systems.
  • Thermostat: The thermostat is what controls your temperature in your home. You might have only one, but it’s preferable to have at least one on every floor for more even heating and cooling.
  • Ductwork: Your home’s ducting is where your air will travel to heat and cool your home, escaping through the vents at the end of the ducts. Some newer systems now offer ductless installations for more flexible options.
  • Blower: The blowers are in the ductwork to help move cool and warm air through ducts efficiently.

There are also some premium elements that you might consider in your installation:

  • Central humidifier: Heating and cooling can affect the humidity level in your home. Humidifiers and dehumidifiers can help the problem, but you might be able to combat it more efficiently with a central humidifier installation, which can control the humidity in your home through your HVAC system.
  • Electronic air cleaner: Those with allergies might benefit from an electric air cleaner installation, which can maximize the filtration of your system.
  • Energy recovery ventilator: Bring fresh air into your home through your HVAC system with an energy recovery ventilator, which helps prevent bacteria in the air from getting trapped inside your home.

Cooling

An air conditioner uses a refrigerant that moves through a compressor. The compressor’s coils contain the refrigerant. When warm air blows over those coils, the refrigerant absorbs it. It then gets pushed by a fan through the ducts and vents in your home.

Once the cooling cycle is complete, the refrigerant moves back into the coils to start the cycle again.

Heating

Heating your home with an HVAC system can happen with a split unit or a packaged unit. A split unit separates the heater from the air conditioner, while a packaged unit contains both the air conditioner and heating units.

Heaters work similarly to air conditioning in that cool air absorbs the hot air a heater creates. The fan then blows the air through the ducts and vents. An exhaust flue then moves toxic gases out of the home.

HVAC Types

Roof Unit

The packaged HVAC units that we mentioned are typically installed on a roof. This makes them a bit challenging to install because they can be incredibly heavy. A certified technician must be able to tell where the best place is to mount the unit where it can be adequately supported by the roof.

A technician will also need to install drain pipes to prevent mold and corrosion from condensation and coolant.

Split Unit

Split units don’t need to go on a roof. Technicians usually install them in a shady location, like near the back of your home, so that direct sunlight won’t prevent them from being as efficient as possible. The heat exchanger must have a concrete platform in place for installation.

Unit Sizes

HVAC units come in a variety of sizes that can be confusing if you’re not sure what their differences are or what you need. A unit that’s too large may be costlier than you need, but one that’s too small may not heat and cool your home efficiently.

Fortunately, it’s easy to do a simple calculation to get a fairly accurate estimate of the size you’ll need. First, find out the square footage of your home. Then, multiply that by 20. A 1200 square foot home would need about 24,000 BTUs of cooling from your HVAC unit.

Installing an HVAC System

Ductwork

Before installing ductwork, your HVAC technician will have to map your home to create a plan for your ducts and vents. He’ll need to consider things like piping, furniture placement, and the types of vents you want (wall or floor).

Sometimes, your existing ductwork will be just fine. However, if your ducts are old or not installed correctly, then the technician may have to redo the full ducting system to create one that will work with your new installation.

Thermostat

There are several types of thermostats to consider for your new HVAC system, including dials, programmable, and smart thermostats. Dialed thermostats are the simplest and most budget-friendly, but they also aren’t the most accurate or efficient.

Programmable thermostats are more efficient than others because you can adjust them according to seasons or the days and times of the week you’re home or out of the home.

Smart thermostats can be costly, but they can also help you control the heating and cooling throughout your home more accurately. Some smart thermostats even let you control other things in your home, like door locks and lights, via a smart system.

The installation cost and complexity will vary depending on the type of thermostat you want for your home.

Repairing and Replacing an HVAC System

Repairing an HVAC system can be a quick fix to a complex project, depending on what the problem is. It’s usually more cost-effective to repair a unit instead of replacing it, but a large repair could potentially cost you more over time than replacing the system for a more cost and energy-efficient model.

Heater / AC System Replacement

If your home is old and its HVAC system hasn’t had an upgrade in decades, then you might be leaning more toward a replacement.

First, you’ll need to consider what your current system does and how big it is. If you don’t plan to add to your home and the unit meets the BTU test we did earlier for its size, then you should stick to a similar size when upgrading.

Remember that, depending on where you live and the age of your home, you may experience some heating and cooling leaks or loss. For example, many older homes don’t have proper installation or energy-efficient windows to hold heat and cool air in. In that case, you’ll want to estimate an additional 10 to 20 BTUs per square foot of your home.

While an energy-efficient 2000 square foot home might only require 40,000 BTUs, a not as efficient home of the same size in a warm climate area may need closer to 80,000 BTUs.

You should also consider things like your home’s wall material, draftiness of doors and windows, how much sunlight your home gets, landscaping that blocks wind from your home, and anything else that can have an impact on your unit’s efficiency. An experienced technician can give you helpful pointers in this area.

If your home experiences very different temperatures in specific areas or levels, you might benefit from also having a whole-house zoning system installed. This system can help you control the temperatures in each room or zone to make your home more energy-efficient.

Electrical Repair

An entirely new HVAC replacement isn’t usually necessary in more modern homes with dependable systems in place. Sometimes, a few repairs are all you need to get your system working like new again. Here are some of the common electrical parts that might warrant repairs and how you can tell if it’s time to fix them:

  • Fuses: Fuses can stop working for a number of reasons, most commonly after a power outage or power surge. Sometimes, when another component fails and begins to work in overdrive, it can cause a fuse to overpower and fail. Fuses are one of the first things to check if your HVAC system stops working correctly and can be one of the simplest
  • Compressor: The compressor helps pump refrigerant through the air conditioning unit and is the component that you hear running outside when your air conditioner turns on. A loud, abnormal sound coming from the unit is a sign that it’s beginning to fail.
  • Capacitors: Capacitors help start your HVAC motor but can weaken after a while. There are usually no warning signs that capacitors start to fail. Instead, once they fail, your motor will just stop working.
  • Fan motors: Your HVAC system has both indoor and outdoor fans. The indoor fans blow air through the ducts and the outdoor fan moves air in the A/C condenser. Both fans can get dust and dirt buildup that can eventually cause the fan to stop running and the motor to burn out. You might hear some loud noises from them when they start to fail. If so, you should try to get them repaired as soon as possible because broken ones can cause other components to stop working correctly.
  • Relay: Relays are switches that activate the components of your HVAC system. They’re electrical, so their failure is most often caused by faulty electrical signals. When one stops working, the element it triggers will also stop working.
  • Circuit board: The circuit board is in the furnace and controls just about everything in your heater. Vibrations, dirt, and debris can cause the circuit board to stop functioning correctly, which can cause the furnace to stop working altogether.

Other Repairs

The following components are also parts of an HVAC system that sometimes need to be fixed, but they deal more with piping than electricity:

  • Coils: Indoor and outdoor coils are what transfer the heat to turn it into cold and warm air. Coils can get debris build up over time which causes them to stop working efficiently. You might notice lower heat or cooling performance from your unit.
  • Drain lines: Drain lines can suffer from buildup, causing them to block and not allow liquid to drain. Most HVAC experts recommend clearing your drain lines annually to prevent this from happening.
  • Refrigerant metering device: This device regulates how much refrigerant moves through your air conditioner, so when it malfunctions, your air conditioner’s compressor will likely underperform. If not caught early enough, your compressor could stop working altogether.
  • Reversing valve: A reversing valve lets your HVAC system shift from heating to cooling and vice versa. They have a filter that can get clogged over time and may prevent the system from making the switch.

Energy Efficiency

Importance of Maintaining Your AC System

Any HVAC system is only as effective as your dedication to maintaining it. Your system isn’t a set-it-and-forget-it piece of your home. It requires care and proper maintenance to keep it working in top shape.

If you don’t routinely change filters or check the system, your heating and cooling will suffer. When components can’t run correctly, they’ll overwork themselves to make up for it, eventually causing them to stop running.

You should commit to doing the following maintenance tasks to keep your HVAC running smoothly:

  • Clear debris and dirt from outdoor components once per month
  • Replace your filter as often as your manufacturer recommends
  • Inspect the fan blades to ensure that they spin correctly and aren’t broken
  • Clean the blades every year before the cooling season starts
  • Remove dust from the coils of your heating unit at least once a year
  • Place shade over your compressor to shield it from the sun and keep it covered in cold months
  • Prevent anything from growing near the compressor, including grass, trees, and flowers

SEER

SEER stands for Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio. You’ll find this rating on HVAC units to describe how much cooling your air conditioning unit gives out compared to how much energy it uses. The higher the number, the better, because it shows that your cooling unit is efficient.

The energy savings you’ll have from a unit with a higher SEER will fluctuate depending on your area’s climate. But, you can generally expect to cut your costs by 30-50% when you upgrade from a 13 SEER to a 20 SEER system.

Energy Star Certification

You’ll also notice an Energy Star Certification for an efficient HVAC system, just like you see on your appliances. This certification proves that the manufacturer made the system more environmentally-friendly and cost-efficient by meeting the standards for Energy Star Certification and guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Your home may also be Energy Star Certified, and your HVAC system will play an essential role in that certification. In addition to a professional checking your home’s water and insulation efficiency, he will also check your HVAC’s efficiency by looking at ductwork, insulation, components, and more.

Insulation Considerations

One of the most important things to consider before upgrading or installing a new HVAC system is your home’s current insulation. Without proper insulation installed, your HVAC’s heating and cooling will escape through the walls of your home, rendering it less efficient than it could be. Insulation should, therefore, be something you consider upgrading before you start your HVAC project.

Some of the more common forms of insulation are:

  • Batt and roll, which is made from anything from fiberglass to wool
  • Foam board, which is standard insulation for interior walls
  • Loose fill, which you’ll see mostly in new construction; you can spray this insulation into walls before covering with sheetrock
  • Sprayed foam insulation, which works best in odd-shaped areas or hard-to-reach areas
  • Structural insulated panels, which are likely the most energy-efficient because they are walls with insulation built into them

Other Heating and Cooling Options and Costs

HVAC isn’t the only type of heating and cooling system around, even if it is most common. You should always consider other options because one may be a better solution for you and your home. Here are a few favorite alternatives to an HVAC system:

  • Radiant heat: Some areas don’t require a lot of heating because they don’t get a lot of cold weather. In this case, portable radiant heaters might do the trick to keep a house warm when the sun goes down. Depending on how many rooms you need to heat, you might spend between $2000 and $4000 on radiant heaters.
  • Baseboard heaters: Baseboard heaters can be a good option for small homes or apartments where installing ducts and vents isn’t an option. You may only spend up to $1000 installing these to warm your space.
  • Window air conditioners: Again, some areas may not have many sweltering days during the year, so window air conditioners could save a lot of money on an expensive cooling system. You can expect to pay an average of $100 to $300 for each unit, depending on their size and BTUs they put out.
  • Geothermal: This system uses heat from under the ground to heat and cool your home. This is one of the eco-friendliest systems, but it can also cost $6000 or more for the system alone, not including labor.

What will it cost to fix your AC?

below are the average or typical cost

A/C Repair Visit Cost

AC1000S           Residential Service Charge                                     69

AC1001S           Commercial Service Charge                                  110

Coil Cleaning Cost

COIL CLEANING COST

AC1001C           Water Wash Condenser                                            75

AC1002C           Chemical Wash Condenser                                    200

AC1003C           Brush Evaporator Coil                                            100

AC1004C           Inspection Door                                                      150

AC1005C           Remove and Clean Evaporator Coil                      980

AC Drain Cleaning & AC Drain Repair Cost

AC DRAIN CLEANING AC DRAIN REPAIR

AC1001D           Cut and Blow Drain Lines                                      175

AC1002D           Minor Drain Repair                                                  150

AC1003D           Major Drain Repair                                                  265

AC1004D           Install pan and Float Switch                                 380

AC1005D           Replace Condensate Pump 10’ line                      450

AC1006D           Install Condensate Pump                                      550

AC1007D           Anti Algae Strips                                                       60

AC1008D           French Drain                                                            425

A/C Repair Cost

A/C Repairs

AC1001R           Remove, Clean and Reinstall Blower ASM           275

AC1002R           Replace Contactor 1.5/2 pole                                 250

AC1003R           Replace Contactor 3 pole                                       300

AC1004R           Blower Relay                                                            250

AC1005R           Replace Fuse                                                             40

AC1006R           Install Fuse Holder                                                   120

AC1007R           To Locate Short (hourly)                                            80

AC1008R           Minor Wire Repair                                                     110

AC1009R           Major Wire Repair                                                     250

AC1010R           Install Disconnect                                                     200

AC1011R           Install Electric Whip                                                 150

AC1012R           Install Disconnect and Whip                                   300

AC1004T           Transformer Replacement 40 VA                           250

AC1005T           Transformer Replacement 75 VA                           310

AC1006T           Universal Replacement Board                                550

AC1007T           OEM Replacement Board            Call Part House

AC Refrigeration Repair Cost

A/C Refrigeration Repair Cost

AC100FR           Leak Isolation Test                                                900

AC100FR           Minor Leak Repair                                                    80

AC100FR           Major Leak Repair (torch, dryer, etc.)                  650

AC100FR           R-22 per pound                                                        155

AC100FR           R-410A                                                                       55

AC100FR           Valve Core Replacement                                          80

AC Duct Repair Cost

AC DUCT REPAIR COST

AC1000D           Seal Equipment Connections (Mastic)                   250

AC1001D           Duct System and 2 Plenums                                  4000

AC1002D           1st Duct to be replaced                                             325

AC1003D           2nd Duct +                                                                 200

AC1004D           Replace Supply Plenum                                          900

AC1005D           Replace Return Plenum                                          500

AC1006D           Add Return (full)                                                      875

AC1007D           Replace Supply Grill                                                150

Misc AC Installation Cost

AC Filters & Filtration Cost

AC1001F           Replaced Return Filter Grill                                   275

AC1002F           Vacuum Return Chase                                            175

AC1003F           Install MAC 2-4 ton                                                   750

AC1004F           Install MAC 5 ton                                                      900

AC1005F           Media Filter Replaced                                              100

AC1006F           Install Reme                                                              950

AC1007F           Reme Bulb Replacement                                          600

AC1008F           Install UV Light                                                         50

AC Thermostat Cost

Thermostat

AC1001T            Non-Programmable Thermostat                             175

AC1002T           Programmable Thermostat                                     350

AC1003T           Programmable WiFi Thermostat                             350

AC Condensor Fan Motor Cost

CONDENSOR FAN MOTOR COST

AC101CM          Replace Motor & Cap 1075 1/3 HP                        475

AC102CM          Replace Motor & Cap 1075 1/2 HP                        550

AC103CM          Replace Motor & Cap 825 1/3 HP                          550

AC104CM          Replace Motor & Cap 825 1/2 HP                          700

AC105CM          Replace Blower Motor and Cap 1/3                       500

AC106CM          Replace Blower Motor and Cap 3/4                       75

AC Capacitor Replacement Cost

AC CAPACITOR Replacement Cost

AC101CP           Replace Run Capacitor                                            230

AC102CP           Replace Dual Run Capacitor (up to 40)                 240

AC103CP           Replace Dual Run Capacitor (45 and up)               27

AC Start Assist Cost

START ASSIST

AC101SA           Install on 1.5 to 2.5 Ton                                           275

AC102SA           Install on 3 to 5 Ton                                                 300

AC Compressor Repair Cost

COMPRESSOR

AC101CP           Replace Leads                                                          300

AC102CP           Replace Burnout Drier                                              400

AC103CP           Warranty Compressor                                            1200

Heating Unit Repair Cost

HEATING REPAIR COST

AC1001H           Replace Roll Out Switch                                          120

AC1002H           Replace Gas Flex                                                     160

AC1003H           Replace Gas Stop                                                     100

AC1004H           Install Drip Leg                                                         220

AC1005H           Install Hot Surface Igniter                                       325

AC1006H           Replace Flue                                                             585

AC1007H           Add if Roofer is needed                                           375

AC1008H           Replace Pressure Switch                                         200

AC1009H           80% Induced Draft Motor                                         550

AC1010H           Restring Electric Element                                        300

AC1011H           Replace Heater                                                         500

AC1012H           Fan Relay (AHU)                                                       220

AC1013H           Replace Sequencer    (5-10KW)                                220

AC1014H           Replace Sequencer (15-20KW)                                280

Goodman AC Installation Cost

Goodman AC Installation Pricing

Goodman    14SEER                2ton        2.5 ton      3ton      3.5ton      4ton       5ton

Condenser                  $3,100     3,200       3,310     3,575      3,750      4,125

HP Cond.                     $3,550     3,750       3,975     4,050      4,350      4,875

Evap Coil                     $1,900     1,975       2,000     2,050      2,125      2,200

AHU                             $2,350     2,500       2,650     2.775      3,025      3,200

Furnace                       $2,500     2,500       2,500     2,525      2,550      2,650

Cond. & Coil                $4.400     4,550       4,675     5,025      5,250      5,700

Furnace & Coil            $3,660     3,700       3,750     3,825      3,920      4,075

Gas System                $6,400     6,550       6,675     7,050      7,300      7,825

            Elec. System               $5,500     5,775       6,025     6,450      6,850      7,400

            HP System                  $6,050     6,400       6,775     6,975      7,525      8,200

 

10 yr parts Warranty Lifetime Heat Exchanger

Amana AC Installation Cost

Amana AC Installation Cost

Amana   16 SEER                    2ton         2.5ton      3ton      3.5ton      4ton        5ton

Condenser                  $3,900     4,050      4,250      4,400      4,550       4,850         

HP Cond                      $4,600     4,800      4,950      5,250      5,400       5,850

Evap Coil                     $2,200     2,300      2,350      2,450      2,525       2,650

AHU                            $2,850     3,000      3,200      3,350      3,650       4,000

Furnace                       $2,900     3,100      3,100      3,300      3,300       3,500

Cond & coil                 $5,200     5,400      5,600      5,875      6,100       6,675

Furnace & coil            $5,000     5,300      5,400      5,650      5,725       6,050

Gas System                $7,400     7,600      7,900      8,200      8,525       8,975

            Elec. System              $6,500     6,800      7,050      7,450      7,925       8,250

            HP System                  $7,250     7,375      7,600      7,775      8,325       8,725         

 

10 yr parts, Lifetime unit replacement Condenser, Lifetime Heat Exchanger

INSTALLATION ADD ONS

AC1001A           Duct Run                                                                    230

AC1002A           Return Plenum                                                          300

AC1003A           Supply Plenum                                                          500

AC1004A           New Duct Run Supply                                               350

AC1005A           New Duct Run Return                                               550

AC1006A           New Return Air Filter Grill                                       190

AC1007A           MAC 1.5 – 4 Ton                                                        425

AC1008A           Mac 5 Ton                                                                 725

AC1009A           UV Light                                                                     480

AC1010A           Reme                                                                          970

AC1011A           Supply Grill                                                                  75

AC1012A           Lineset & Cover                                                      1000

AC1013A           Condensate Pump                                                    525

AC1014A           Pan & Float Switch                                                   150

AC1015A           Disconnect                                                                 360

AC1016A           3ph Disconnect                                                          400

AC1017A           Whip                                                                             75

AC1018A           Wifi Thermostat                                                         360

AC1019A           Programmable Thermostat                                      270

AC1020A           Move Thermostat                                                      250

AC1021A           Zoning (2) 800 each add. Zone                             4000

AC1022A           Crane                                                                          600

AC1023A           Walkway/Bridge                                                         200

AC1024A           Rooftop Unit                                                              150

AC1025A           Vent Kit                                                                     425

AC1026A           Greater than 7% pitch Roof                                     375

AC1027A           Tight Access                                                             500

AC1028A           Pull and Reset Stairs                                                650

AC1029A           Remove and Reinstall Access (No Painting)         150

AC1030A           Electric Switch/light                                                 450

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AC Installation Add-On Cost

INSTALLATION ADD ONS

AC1001A           Duct Run                                                                    230

AC1002A           Return Plenum                                                          300

AC1003A           Supply Plenum                                                          500

AC1004A           New Duct Run Supply                                               350

AC1005A           New Duct Run Return                                               550

AC1006A           New Return Air Filter Grill                                       190

AC1007A           MAC 1.5 – 4 Ton                                                        425

AC1008A           Mac 5 Ton                                                                 725

AC1009A           UV Light                                                                     480

AC1010A           Reme                                                                          970

AC1011A           Supply Grill                                                                  75

AC1012A           Lineset & Cover                                                      1000

AC1013A           Condensate Pump                                                    525

AC1014A           Pan & Float Switch                                                   150

AC1015A           Disconnect                                                                 360

AC1016A           3ph Disconnect                                                          400

AC1017A           Whip                                                                             75

AC1018A           Wifi Thermostat                                                         360

AC1019A           Programmable Thermostat                                      270

AC1020A           Move Thermostat                                                      250

AC1021A           Zoning (2) 800 each add. Zone                             4000

AC1022A           Crane                                                                          600

AC1023A           Walkway/Bridge                                                         200

AC1024A           Rooftop Unit                                                              150

AC1025A           Vent Kit                                                                     425

AC1026A           Greater than 7% pitch Roof                                     375

AC1027A           Tight Access                                                             500

AC1028A           Pull and Reset Stairs                                                650

AC1029A           Remove and Reinstall Access (No Painting)         150

AC1030A           Electric Switch/light                                                 450

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AC Repair Service Ashburn

Recent AC Repair Service Quotes

AC Repair Service Request: “I would like to have my compressor checked I think it’s leaking?”

AC Repair Service Quote: Two ways we can tackle this issue. Often people just replace the coil without checking the full system. We recommend checking for bigger issues first before simply replacing the coil.

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*These prices are typical, but also subject to change. Replacement quotes are based on using customer provided equipment. Prices are for normal residential installations and are to help you understand our upfront pricing.
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